asha international mental health

We Give Hope

Stories Change Lives

  Most American teenagers — across demographic groups — see depression and anxiety as major problems among their peers, a new survey by the Pew Research Center found. The survey found that 70 percent of teenagers saw mental health as a big issue.    At ASHA International, our youth Storytellers are dedicated to sharing their stories to give hope and let their peers know they are not alone, and encourage them to get the help they need to recover and thrive. Together, we are creating a safe space where students can talk about their struggles and support each other with empathy and compassion.   Here is feedback from students about our Let‘s Talk About Mental Health Program at local high schools in February:   “Right now, I’m going through something really hard. But the presentations have convinced me that recovery is possible and I can get over it.”   “Very inspiring! As a person struggling with anxiety, this program was very uplifting & safe.”   “I’ve been struggling with my mental health for years and never asked for help and like the storyteller said – she tried to commit suicide and nobody knew – that’s what happened to me. The storytellers made me realize in order to feel better, I must seek help.”   “Some of my friends are dealing with mental illnesses and the presentation gave me a different view on it, and how to help them.”   “I went to the same middle school as the Storyteller, and it is comforting to know that there are people at my school who can help me with my problems.”   “The personal stories were very...

How to support a loved one struggling with mental health issues

When I fist started struggling with anxiety, panic attacks and depression at eighteen, my family and I had no understanding about mental health issues. Unfortunately, neither did the doctors, many of whom told my parents that I was just being a “drama queen,” a “typical teenager.” “Tough love” was prescribed and doled out each day, which only alienated me from my parents and turned them into strangers I feared. Eventually, I began feeling like a pariah in my own home, and began to crumble without their love, understanding and support. Over the years, our home which was once a fortress of love, became a prison from which I couldn’t escape. It wasn’t until I had survived through seven years of hell and tried to kill myself, that my parents finally took me to a psychiatrist who diagnosed me with depression for the first time, and began to treat me. It took two more years of failed suicide attempts and hospitalizations before my family and I finally began to educate ourselves about mental health issues. A caring intern at the hospital told my family that it wasn’t enough for me to educate myself about depression, it was critical that they educat themselves about mental health issues, if they wanted to support me in my road to recovery and wellness. Fortunately, my parents did, and have since grown into the greatest support system in my life. Over the years, they have also reached out to others struggling in the community. According to the World Health Organization, one in four people in the world will be affected by mental or neurological disorders at some point...

You Can Recover: Khatera’s Message of Hope

As a little girl, Khatera moved with her family from Afghanistan to the U.S. Growing up, she felt like an outsider and was overwhelmed with the responsibility of interpreting and advocating for the survival of her family. Over the years, she struggled with ADHD, anxiety and depression. Today, Khatera is a mother and mental health activist. She wants to let people struggling with mental health issues around the world know that “no matter what your struggles are, YOU CAN RECOVER.” SEE MORE RECOVERY VIDEOS DO YOU HAVE A RECOVERY STORY? Stories have the power to inform, inspire and transform lives. If you have a recovery story, please  submit your story today. Your story will educate people about mental health issues, eliminate stigma, and give HOPE to people struggling with mental health issues, and let them know recovery is possible. The post You Can Recover: Khatera’s Message of Hope appeared first on Shadows in the Sun by Gayathri...

You Can Recover: Khatera’s Story

As a little girl, Khatera moved with her family from Afghanistan to the U.S. Growing up, she felt like an outsider and was overwhelmed with the responsibility of interpreting and advocating for the survival of her family. Over the years, she struggled with ADHD, anxiety and depression. Today, Khatera is a mother and mental health activist. She wants to let people struggling with mental health issues around the world know that “no matter what your struggles are, YOU CAN RECOVER.” SEE MORE RECOVERY VIDEOS DO YOU HAVE A RECOVERY STORY? Stories have the power to inform, inspire and transform lives. If you have a recovery story, please  submit your story today. Your story will educate people about mental health issues, eliminate stigma, and give HOPE to people struggling with mental health issues, and let them know recovery is...
How to Talk to Your Kids About Suicide: Experts Share Tips for Parents

How to Talk to Your Kids About Suicide: Experts Share Tips for Parents

A year ago, a dear friend lost her brother to suicide. Overwhelmed with grief, she didn’t know how to talk to her 9-year-old son about his uncle’s death. As a mother and mental health advocate I understand how difficult it is for parents to talk about suicide with their children. But it is critical we do. Given that suicide is the second leading cause of death among those ages 15-24, and the third leading cause of death among children ages 10-14 year old, it is time we take the time to talk to our children about suicide. And, here is a valuable article to help us… The post How to Talk to Your Kids About Suicide: Experts Share Tips for Parents appeared first on Shadows in the Sun by Gayathri...
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