asha international mental health

We Give Hope

Kids work to change cultural perceptions of mental health

According to a recent story by KATU reporter and ASHA Board member Genevieve Reaume, data from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) shows white people have the highest rate of suicide in America, but many minorities are expressing grave concern over rising rates. If you take a broader look at suicide rates across cultures, it’s clear many communities are struggling to stop suicides.Younger Americans who’ve got roots across the globe say culture can impact the mental health discussion. Read more… We are deeply grateful to our Youth Storyteller Yamini Rajan and her parents for sharing their perspectives. At ASHA International, we are dedicated to empowering people living with mental health conditions and their families to share their stories to normalize the conversation about mental health, and give...

My Story My SUPERPOWER Storytelling Show was a huge success!

Thanks to everyone who attended our My Story My Superpower Storytelling Show on May 29th. What an inspiring event! It was an evening of laughter, tears and breaking down stereotypes. We are so grateful for our amazing storytellers who shared their mental health journey.   Sharing stories about mental health is hard, and at times, uncomfortable. Molly even asked the crowd if her story made them uncomfortable. She shared that there has never been any positive change without people feeling a little uncomfortable.   Dave’s story of how his family has managed his young daughter’s anxiety was moving. Each day may bring its own challenges but we must reflect that we all have things to be thankful for. He shared a quote, taken from the Berlin Wall that is now tattooed on his arm and provides him strength day to day.   “Right now, someone is dreaming of living your life.”   Mental health affects us all. Sharing stories is the best way we know to give hope.   With your support we are able to shine a light on mental health and end the stigma, one story at a time.   Please consider making a gift today to support ASHA International. Your contribution will allow us to bring our message of hope and well being to more people at school, in the workplace and in our community. Please click here to Give the Gift of Hope today!   Here is feedback from people who attended the event:   “The program last night was amazing. My daughter kept turning to me saying “that’s me!”. She just started seeing an anxiety...

Meet Our Storytellers

Stories connect and comfort us in our shared struggles, help us know that we are not alone, and give us HOPE to cope, survive and thrive. Personal stories have the power to save lives and create social change. On May 29, 2019, in celebration of Mental Health Awareness Month, ASHA International is delighted to present the My Story My SUPERPOWER storytelling show to shine a light on mental health & end stigma one story at a time. A diverse group of storytellers will share their journey of courage, hope and resilience to increase public awareness of mental health as an integral part of overall health and well-being. The event will be held at the Intel Hawthorne Farms Auditorium (HF3), 5200 NE Elam Young Pkwy, Hillsboro, OR 97124, from 7 – 9 PM. Admission is FREE. To RSVP, please email info@myasha.org                                                 Diane Kaufman, M.D. Diane is a child psychiatrist, poet, lyricist, and artist passionate about helping people transform trauma into creative resilience. She is an Arnold P. Gold Foundation “humanism in medicine” awardee. Amongst Diane’s many creative works, her story, “Bird That Wants to Fly,” inspired a children’s opera by Michael Raphael, performed by Trilogy: An Opera Company, and narrated by the actor, Danny Glover. Diane suffered trauma starting at a very young age, and experienced episodes of anxiety, depression, hypomania, mania, and suicidal ideation. She graduated magna cum laude and phi beta kappa from Mount Holyoke College. While attending Downstate Medical Center, Diane attempted suicide and required...
She did it to herself…

She did it to herself…

As former Prime Minister of India, Indira Gandhi said, “Life is a continuous process of adjustment. “When my father suddenly passed away nearly twenty years ago, I never thought my privileged happy go lucky life would crash. Gradually, within two years, my mother’s mental state started to decline with clouded decision making, irritability, and her million-dollar-watt smile faded and eventually became non-existent. Hindu Priests manipulated the fact we are Brahmins, and created a paranoia in her delicate mind because they reassured her we did not perform my father’s rituals properly. Their solution was to instill fear at an emotional and financial price. My mom, my best friend, my sister suddenly felt like my enemy because we could not see eye to eye on anything, creating major meltdowns. It was impossible for me to comprehend what was happening. Was she severely depressed, brainwashed or just losing the plot. It was very challenging for me to confide in people because I was ashamed to air our “dirty laundry” in public or even admit my mom possibly had a mental illness. I wanted to cry for help, but people would say my mom is naïve and delicate like a flower. Fast forward nearly two decades, at the age of 69, my mom has been officially diagnosed with dementia, a disease of the mind.  Earlier this year, when I interacted with some Aunties and they inquired about my mom, and I told them about her diagnosis they said… she did it to herself. The fact is she did not do it to herself, nor does she deserve to go through this journey alone. Dementia particularly vascular dementia does require a medical diagnosis and sadly...

My Story, My Journey – By Subrina Singh

Subrina Singh is a passionate young writer and recently published her love story entitled, “Soniye” in the anthology of Sikh Love Stories, Her Name is Kaur. After completing her degree in Asian and Asian American Studies at Stony Brook University, she is now pursuing her Master’s Degree at Columbia University in South Asian Studies. More recently, she has become committed to using her experience with mental illness to help better the mental-health awareness within the South Asian community. She currently writes for BrownGirlMagazine.com & ZeeTV’s India.com. ASHA International salutes Subrina’s courage in sharing her...
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