asha international mental health

We Give Hope

Let’s Celebrate the Class of 2020!

Over the last few years, we have had the privilege of mentoring youth storytellers Hanna Kane, Jaxon Buell, Hoda AbouEich & Eric Martz. Their stories have inspired and empowered thousands of youth and adults to take charge of their mental health and well-being. Their courage, resilience and activism will lead us into a better world of equity & inclusion. Please join us in congratulating the class of 2020, and wishing them the very best.  Hanna Kane   This fall I will be attending the Honors College at University of Washington with a plan to study constitutional law and American history. My goal is to become an attorney practicing constitutional law with a focus on social justice and big data. In college I am looking forward to connecting with the queer community, taking as varied classes as I can, and perhaps studying abroad in Ireland.    Becoming an ASHA storyteller has allowed me to reclaim control of my story, sharing my struggles to empower others and myself in the process. It has taught me the power of both a single story and a community coming together to support healing and growth. I will always be a storyteller at heart, and I am incredibly grateful for the opportunities I’ve had with the organization.  Jaxon Buell   This fall I will be a private in the Marine Corps with a M.O.S. of intelligence. My goal is to become a data analyst for one of the US intelligence agencies. During my time in the Marine Corps, I look forward to making new and lifelong friends and comrades, as well as being able to...

Battling suicide through storytelling

We are delighted to share that PBS News Hour Student Reporting Lab published the short film created by students at the Health & Science School about our Let’s Talk About Mental Health School Program. One in five youth in the United States struggles with a mental health condition that interferes with daily life. Of the 74.5 million children in the United States, an estimated 17.1 million have or have had a psychiatric disorder — more than the number of children with cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. Half of all psychiatric illness occurs before the age of 14, and 75 percent by the age of 24. Children and adolescents with mental health conditions are at risk for academic failure, substance abuse, clashes with the juvenile justice system and suicide — all of which come at a tremendous cost to them, their families, and the community. Suicide is the second leading cause of death for 15 to 24-year-olds. In spite of the magnitude of the problem, lack of awareness and entrenched stigma keep the majority of these young people from getting help. At ASHA International, we are determined to educate and empower youth to take charge of their mental health & well-being. The Let’s Talk About Mental Health program is a peer-to-peer mental health education program to engage students in a conversation about mental health to promote well-being and prevent...
It’s time to talk about youth mental health.

It’s time to talk about youth mental health.

At 12, Yamini and her family moved from India to the U.S. and the transition was very difficult. Her struggles to fit in combined with her mother’s battle with breast cancer pushed her into a vicious cycle of self-harm, bulimia, and depression. After attempting to take her life at the age of 13 Yamini realized that things had to change. Watch Yamini share her story of her journey to wellness and healing....
3 tips to navigate through these difficult times

3 tips to navigate through these difficult times

The COVID-19 pandemic is having a severe impact on my mental health. I am unable to go to school and finish off my senior year the way I had dreamed of for the last four years. I am unable to leave the house unless I am working or need “essential goods”. Staying at home has been extremely overwhelming to the point where I’ve needed to leave home for the sake of my own mental health. I’ve learned to put my mental health first. I realized that being stuck at home all day with people that were not supportive or understanding of my situation whatsoever was detrimental to my mental health. I was so angry and anxious all the time, and when I realized when the root of the problem was, I was able to pinpoint it and fix it. While I can’t go out with my friends, we are definitely staying in contact over Face Time and text. It is very important to me to check in with my friends to make sure that they are okay and doing well during this time as well. I also really enjoy keeping in contact with my school whether that be my principal, teachers, administrators, school counselors, etc. It makes me very happy when I see an email or a message from someone I really look up to at my school because it is a constant reminder that they have not forgotten about me. Here are 3 tips I want to share with you as we navigate through these difficult times: Hope you find them helpful. Try something new: pick up a...
Speaking up & seeking help helped me heal from PTSD and depression.

Speaking up & seeking help helped me heal from PTSD and depression.

Adverse childhood experiences like abuse and trauma can have a life-long debilitating impact on the mental health & well-being of children. Hoda’s story is a powerful reminder to speak up and seek help. It can save your life. Hoda’s story is also a reminder that all it takes is one person to believe in your story to help you get the support you need. I encourage everyone of you to be that person – Be the...
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