asha international mental health

We Give Hope

Resilience is everyone’s birthright

“That resilience is everyone’s birthright, and we’re going to see it sometimes and we’re not going to see it other times.” There’s no doubt this pandemic and the fight for racial justice have challenged us. Many of us have encountered very dark moments, but the words above are as true for 2020 as they were during the 2019 Grit and Grace Multicultural Women’s Mental Health Conference. This year we have another incredible line up of women to help us all through these challenging times and find our strength. We are better together. Please, join us this year.. We know the need is great so our conference is FREE and virtual. Learn more and register at...

When I think of the word grit, I think of tenacity.

Our mental health matters. Women’s mental health matters. At AHSA our focus has always been on diverse storytelling. We know we find strength in one another. Our Grit and Grace Multicultural Women’s Mental Health Conference is free this year because we know how crucial it is everyone has access to this resource. Please, head to www.myasha.org/Grit&Grace to learn more about our powerful speakers this year and to sign up! We can’t wait to have you join us...

Together we can learn how to best help those looking to find hope through us

The Grit and Grace conference is for mental health providers, too. Together we can learn how to best help those looking to find hope through us. As Ebony Clarke, the director of the Multnomah County Mental Health and Addictions Services Division, said at our conference last year, we have “to create a level platform where everyone’s voice can be heard.” Because of what’s been happening, and the direct impact it has on all our mental health, we’ve made this year’s Grit and Grace conference FREE. Learn more and register...
My story – surviving the loss of my beloved daughter Priya

My story – surviving the loss of my beloved daughter Priya

    My name is Geetha Balagopal.   My beloved daughter Priya was lost to suicide on January 10th 2016 during her 4th suicide attempt. Priya was a beautiful girl, a quiet, introverted, brilliant and dignified child, who excelled in whatever activity she participated in.  The anxiety was always there but I was not aware of it.  She was bullied in school and it started very early – in Kindergarten.  I never knew about it.  She didn’t have many friends but got calls from classmates who needed help with homework.  During the summer of her junior year in high school, she told me that she has OCD.  My response was “you have too much time on your hands disorder” Having been raised in a culture where you are conditioned to “just do what is required without complaining”- I didn’t realize the seriousness of it. Priya left home when she was 15 and a half years old to join the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, (a boarding school for highly gifted high school kids) around the same time she told me that she had OCD.  She only came home one day a month – and she only called or texted if she needed supplies or food.  She made new friends, fell in love with Indian dance and I was happy for her. One day in early 2009, I was driving Priya back to school –about to merge on the highway, when she said that she feels hopeless and that “life is not worth living”.  I almost ran off the road but kept my voice calm and asked her why...
Journal of an anxious soul

Journal of an anxious soul

If the voice in your head is constantly telling you that ‘you are not doing enough’ or ‘you are not enough’, it is probably your anxiety speaking. Because of this voice in your head, if you tend to overwork yourself and still tend to criticize yourself – guess what? It is anxiety! If you constantly feel your mind is playing tricks with you – making you overthink and over-analyze situations or people’s actions/reactions, and seek external validation to determine your self-worth, it is probably your anxiety speaking. If you struggle to say ‘NO’ and tend to overextend yourself, it is a manifestation of your anxious behavior. If you are hard on yourself and feel excessive guilt for small things like saying ‘NO’ to someone, taking time off work, gaining weight….and the list is endless, again – it is again your anxiety taking over. If you feel you are battling your own thoughts 24*7, it is probably anxiety. If you have moments where your mind is clouded with obsessive thoughts and you have difficulty concentrating, it is probably anxiety. When did I realize I had anxiety? I have lived with anxiety for close to 10 years now! Gosh! Imagine having to deal with all those thoughts on an everyday basis – it is so exhausting! I realized I had anxiety last year after a breakup when my life started to seem like a mess. I would try and concentrate on work but was unable to concentrate due to the obsessive thoughts conquering my head. Daily tasks seemed to overwhelm me, and my heart would start racing as I would begin...
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