asha international mental health

We Give Hope

2020 Grit & Grace Conference was an inspiring event!

On September 18th, women from across cultures came together to share their mental health stories to give hope and empower each other to heal and thrive. And, women from across the Unites States and around the world joined in virtually. Thank you to all who attended and to all who bravely shared their stories. We once again thank our generous sponsors for making this event possible. And thanks to all our hardworking volunteers who gave their precious time to come together to create a community of connection, hope and well-being. Together, we are normalizing conversations about mental health and inspiring hope and well-being, one story at a time. We can’t wait to see you all at the 2021 Grit & Grace Conference! Thank you for your valuable testimonials! Here are a few we would like to share: “WOW! Completely blown away. It was one of the best conferences I’ve been to in ages. So inspiring, motivating, and uplifting. It was exactly what I didn’t know I needed at this moment in my life. So thank you for that. I appreciated the multiple voices and perspectives and really, really found the youth so inspiring. Can’t thank you enough.” “The Grit and Grace Conference was beautifully put together. The passion and genuineness of each presenter was felt and seen. It was great to hear people tell their own stories and offer support and a togetherness through this avenue. This was important for the mental health field as well as for all humans as we navigate these troubling, tumultuous waters.” “The Grit and Grace Conference was very uplifting and different. This was...

Resilience is everyone’s birthright

“That resilience is everyone’s birthright, and we’re going to see it sometimes and we’re not going to see it other times.” There’s no doubt this pandemic and the fight for racial justice have challenged us. Many of us have encountered very dark moments, but the words above are as true for 2020 as they were during the 2019 Grit and Grace Multicultural Women’s Mental Health Conference. This year we have another incredible line up of women to help us all through these challenging times and find our strength. We are better together. Please, join us this year.. We know the need is great so our conference is FREE and virtual. Learn more and register at...

When I think of the word grit, I think of tenacity.

Our mental health matters. Women’s mental health matters. At AHSA our focus has always been on diverse storytelling. We know we find strength in one another. Our Grit and Grace Multicultural Women’s Mental Health Conference is free this year because we know how crucial it is everyone has access to this resource. Please, head to www.myasha.org/Grit&Grace to learn more about our powerful speakers this year and to sign up! We can’t wait to have you join us...

Together we can learn how to best help those looking to find hope through us

The Grit and Grace conference is for mental health providers, too. Together we can learn how to best help those looking to find hope through us. As Ebony Clarke, the director of the Multnomah County Mental Health and Addictions Services Division, said at our conference last year, we have “to create a level platform where everyone’s voice can be heard.” Because of what’s been happening, and the direct impact it has on all our mental health, we’ve made this year’s Grit and Grace conference FREE. Learn more and register...
My story – surviving the loss of my beloved daughter Priya

My story – surviving the loss of my beloved daughter Priya

    My name is Geetha Balagopal.   My beloved daughter Priya was lost to suicide on January 10th 2016 during her 4th suicide attempt. Priya was a beautiful girl, a quiet, introverted, brilliant and dignified child, who excelled in whatever activity she participated in.  The anxiety was always there but I was not aware of it.  She was bullied in school and it started very early – in Kindergarten.  I never knew about it.  She didn’t have many friends but got calls from classmates who needed help with homework.  During the summer of her junior year in high school, she told me that she has OCD.  My response was “you have too much time on your hands disorder” Having been raised in a culture where you are conditioned to “just do what is required without complaining”- I didn’t realize the seriousness of it. Priya left home when she was 15 and a half years old to join the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, (a boarding school for highly gifted high school kids) around the same time she told me that she had OCD.  She only came home one day a month – and she only called or texted if she needed supplies or food.  She made new friends, fell in love with Indian dance and I was happy for her. One day in early 2009, I was driving Priya back to school –about to merge on the highway, when she said that she feels hopeless and that “life is not worth living”.  I almost ran off the road but kept my voice calm and asked her why...
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